7 Keys to Setting Attainable Health Goals

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We live in a culture of resignation.

 

We resign ourselves to physical limitations,

past failures, and poor health. More often than

not, our beliefs about what we are capable of

accomplishing keep us from fulfilling our dreams.

Beliefs about what success is possible for us,

keep us from reaching our goals.

 

As we approach the end of this year, we are

going to talk about keys to achieving some of

the most important goals we can set for

ourselves.  Goals that result in better health,

and improved quality of life . . . not just for

2017, but for many years to come.

 

So, what are you going to need to do differently?

 

You probably know what it is.  The problem we

all seem to have is actually doing it.

 

Here are 7 keys to bridging the gap between

your goals and actually accomplishing them.

 

1. Look Back Before Looking Ahead

 

Before we jump into next year, let's reflect on

2016.  Take an honest look at your goals from

last year and see in what areas you fell short.

 

Also, take time to celebrate your wins and

successes.  This will give you confidence when

taking on new challenges this year.

 

2. Decide What You Want

 

This may sound obvious, but is not always as

simple as it seems. To reach the outcomes we

want in the coming year, we must decide what

we want.

 

We must be very clear with ourselves as to what

success will look like.  Making the outcomes

specific and measurable will improve your chances

of success.

 

3. Make Your Goals Attainable

 

I want you to think really big and believe you

can achieve great things this year.  However,

you must be realistic.  Decide if your goal and

the time line you have is attainable.

 

Can you see yourself reaching this goal in 2017?

 

4. Ask Yourself Why You Want This

 

What will you gain if you achieve this goal?

Perhaps it is energy, self confidence, less pain,

or a longer life. Eating healthy just for the sake

of your blood pressure won't motivate you

when temptation strikes.

 

You must think about why. You have to know

what eating healthy and lowering your blood

pressure will allow you to do.   Maybe it's to

play golf, or go on an adventurous vacation

with your spouse.

 

5. Consider Doing Nothing

 

After you make it clear why you are making

this goal, take it one step further.  Think a few

minutes about what would happen if you

choose to do nothing.

 

May you have to take early retirement? Will

you miss out on a family vacation? Will it

negatively effect your relationship with your

spouse?

 

6. Set Short Term Milestones

 

Improving your health can be a long road.

Set shorter term, perhaps two to four week,

milestones and build on them as you go.

 

This allows you to focus on your progress,

instead of on how far you still have to go.

 

7. Anticipate Barriers To Success

 

As you work toward your 2017 goals you will

have barriers that get in your way.  Think

through what they may be and how you will

deal with them ahead of time.

 

Roadblocks are a part of life.  They do not

equal failure.

 

In review, consider why you want to achieve

your goals, picture yourself reaching them,

establish short term wins, and anticipate the

roadblocks.

 

Start considering what changes you want to

make in your life. One business philosopher

said " You cannot change the circumstances,

the seasons, or the wind, but you can change

yourself".

 

All this self discovery can be overwhelming!

 

That's why I began my exploration of changes

that I want to make this year with a

LifeScore Assessment.  This comprehensive

yet simple {FREE} tool helped me find the

areas in my life that will most benefit from

growth this year.  The areas that matter

most to me.

 

I believe it will also give you the clarity you

need to create an amazing, healthy, fulfilled

life in 2017.

 

I am curious how many of you will be

making health goals this year.  Comment

below on the areas of change you are going

to focus on this coming year after you take

your LifeScore Assessment.